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Lindsay’s Lit(erary) List

By: Lindsay Hittner

Winning by Jack Welch

Photo via GoodReads

Photo via GoodReads

I highly recommend this book!  It’s a good read for anyone in any business. And unlike many business management books, I actually found it engaging and quick to read.  The book is broken into 3 parts:

  • Company: Business management, leadership, PEOPLE management...which no one puts enough focus on, and more.
  • Outside Forces: Competitors, mergers, etc. 
  • Career: Food for thought on your own career, work/life balance, excelling, doing what you love and loving what you do. 

His straightforwardness really resonated with me and he goes through frequently asked questions from speaking engagements over the years. If you want to “win,” this is the book to read.


The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker

Photo via Google Images

Photo via Google Images

I can't recommend this book enough.  It can literally save your life (and says so right on the cover!).  It's all about survival signals that can help you avoid danger.  I know it sounds like it’d be a scary read but it oddly wasn’t for me; I actually felt safer after reading it.  Gavin de Becker goes through many case studies from his own career and forces on how the victims got away…but the book is much more than that.  He delves into personality traits to look out for, strategies to be aware of, and learning how to trust your "gut" instinct (when you have that feeling that something isn't right but your brain hasn't even had the time to process what it is yet). He even discusses work situations like how to fire certain types of personalities to avoid retaliation.  I recommend it to everyone, but especially women.  I’ve read it twice now.   


The Confidence Code: The Science and Art of Self-Assurance – What Women Should Know by Katty Kay & Claire Shipman

My take? Don’t bother reading it.  This book is a New York Times best seller but I didn't think it was all that empowering for women in business.  It actually felt like the opposite for me.  The authors spend the majority of the book pointing out all of the ways women aren’t confident, delving into case studies, and interviewing women across various industries: Military, Sports, Politics, etc.  Their tone was off-putting to me as a feminist, which I admit, might have been why I disliked it so much.  While Katty and Claire spent much of the book pointing out all the ways women lack confidence, they spent very little time discussing how to overcome and achieve confidence.  

Modern Romance by Aziz Ansari

Photo via GoodReads

Photo via GoodReads

I loved this book.  I picked it up thinking it would be full of hilarious observations about dating from a standup comedian, and it was…but it was so much much more than that!  The book was incredibly well researched, and unbelievably interesting to me, as it truly is an in-depth look into modern dating.  As a fan of most of Aziz’s work, I loved reading about some of the sociological research and personal anecdotes that influenced his writing of Master of None (if you haven’t watched it, check it out on Netflix.  Season 2 is coming out soon..woo-hoo!).  If you’ve ever been ghosted, this is the book for you.  I highly recommend it, especially anyone single and using dating apps.    

Defending Jacob by William Landay

Photo via Amazon

Photo via Amazon

I’m partial to a good legal thriller and this one did not disappoint.  The story is about a District Attorney in a small New England town.  A boy in his son's class is found dead and while the book is a who-done-it, it takes a big turn when his son becomes a suspect.  The D.A. is taken off the case case because of this conflict of interest, and it becomes a page-turner as you discover what the Dad didn't know about the teenage boy living in his house, his own son, Jacob.  Whether his son is innocent or not, the book is fascinating as you discover the downward spiral of this family’s life because of the case.  It's a great read.  


Drive by Daniel H. Pink

Photo via Amazon

Photo via Amazon

This book is all about how to motivate people.  It’s not a fun book to read, and it’s full of case studies and psychological research.  The net-net is: pay people enough to take money off the table so it's not an issue for them, and keep them challenged.  The three components of motivation he discusses in depth are autonomy, mastery, and purpose. Absorb that information and you don’t need to read the book!     

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

Photo via GoodReads

Photo via GoodReads

I can’t recommend this book enough!  Trevor Noah was born in South Africa under apartheid, and he was quite literally born a crime- to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother- which was illegal under apartheid. The stories of his upbringing, his strong mother, his mischievous shenanigans, and his love for books and language are page-turners.  I laughed out loud, I learned quite a bit, and I shed tears.  He’s unbelievably smart, and the book effortlessly reads like his speaking style.   Even though I just read this book, I’m now listening to it, as I wanted to hear his telling of his stories, and I wanted to hear him speak in multiple languages. The second time around, the book does not disappoint!  Read it.  Read it.  Read it.


And I’m currently reading Wild by Cheryl Strayed - love it for far!  I’m constantly crushing books, while simultaneously planning out the next 5 books that I’m going to read.  My “Want to Read” section on HelloReads.com  is getting laughably long but luckily the site makes it easy to keep track of what I’ve read, and what I want to read.  It’s my go-to place for book recs.  Check it out!